1st Circuit Court of Appeals Upholds Tax Refund In False Claims Act Case

The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit upheld the district court’s decision allowing Fresenius Medical Care Holdings, Inc. (f/k/a National Medical Care, Inc.) to deduct $95 Million from a $385 Million dollar civil settlement under the False Claims Act (“FCA”).  Accordingly, the First Circuit affirmed the district court’s tax refund judgment in favor of Fresenius in the amount of $50,420,512 (Fresenius Medical Care Holdings, Inc. v. United States, August 13, 2014, Case No. 13-2144).

The First Circuit held that, in determining the tax treatment of a FCA civil settlement, the court may consider factors beyond the presence or absence of a tax characterization agreement.  In reaching its decision, the Court applied generally accepted principles of tax law to depart from earlier contrary authority in Talley Industries Inc. v. Commissioner, 116 F.3d 392 (9th Cir. 1997).

Because Fresenius and the government did not agree on the tax characterization of the FCA civil settlement, the critical consideration in determining deductibility was the extent to which the disputed settlement payment was compensatory as opposed to punitive.  The Court acknowledged that no deduction may be made for fines or penalties paid to the government for legal violations, whereas compensatory damages paid to the government, which are deductible, do not constitute a fine or penalty.  26 U.S.C. §162(f).

The First Circuit rejected the government’s argument and interpretation of Talley, in part, based on the notion that substance prevails over form in tax characterizations of transactions between private parties, and that amounts paid or received in settlement should receive the same tax treatment, to the extent practicable, as would have applied had the dispute been litigated to judgment.

Judge Selya, who is known for using uncommon words and phrases to draw an intersection between jurisprudence and interesting prose, authored the Fresenius opinion for the First Circuit and he did not disappoint.  The opinion, makes use of several intriguing words and phrases, such as:  gallimaufry, explicated, ordained, asseverates, asseveration, talismanic, ferocity, expedient, indistinct beacon, inters, the graveyard of forgotten canons, perforce, infelicitous asymmetry, judicial fiat, paint the lily, remonstrance, calumnizes, patina of plausibility, pari passu, and praxis.

For additional information regarding the False Claims Act, please contact Adam Snyder.



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